Japanese company introduces irresistibly cute mindcontrolled cat ears w video

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img Citation: Japanese company introduces irresistibly cute mind-controlled ‘cat ears’ (w/ video) (2011, May 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-japanese-company-irresistibly-cute-mind-controlled.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The company, called Neurowear, demonstrated its new product in the “Smile Bazar”at Omotesando Hills, which it captured on video and displays on its site; and while the participants are clearly amused by the cat ears moving around, and there is much smiling and some laughing, it’s difficult to tell just how much control over the ears the wearers have. A natural question arises also as to whether people can get better at manipulating their ears if they wear them over time.In spite of the gimmick quality of the necomimi, it’s obvious that the concept could have a more serious purpose, such as helping those with communication difficulties express themselves. Also, a not so obvious part of the necomimi experience is the reaction of the people around the person wearing the ears; in the video, it’s impossible to not notice the looks of mirth on the faces of the people around, and, it’s difficult to not smile yourself as you watch the people in the video try on the device; their reactions, and the way the ears react combined with the expressions on their face, is actually rather profound, though it’s hard to say why. Whether it’s the cuteness factor, or a feeling that something is being conveyed by the person, albeit artificial ears, that you don’t generally see in any other way, there is something unique and sweet about the whole human/machine interaction that very clearly evokes something in others.The necomimi is another in a long line of products that listen and respond to brain waves, and doubtless there will be many more, though what’ s not certain, is whether they will be nearly as cute. More information: via neurowear.net/ © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — In a bit of science mixed with whimsy, a Japanese company has created a set of electromechanical cat ears that can be worn on the human head and manipulated with nothing but the mind. Called the necomimi (a combination of the Japanese words for cat and ear) and looking very much like the ears that come with a cat costume, the ears respond to thoughts or mood by means of a sensor on a second small band pressed against the forehead; they can stand straight up when the wearer is concentrating, or wriggle and turn slightly when amused, or lay flat when tired or bored, demonstrating what the company calls, an ability to reveal emotion. Newborn ear deformities corrected without surgerylast_img read more


Health and Retirement study indicates people wildly underestimate how long they will

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img(Phys.org) —The University of Michigan conducted a poll back in 1992, asking 26,000 men and women over the age of 50 and living in the U.S. what they thought about their chances of living to age 75, was it 10 percent, 50, 100? It was all part of a Health and Retirement survey conducted to shed some light on what people were doing about saving for retirement in light of news that social security might not be the safety net many people have been hoping for. Now, 22 years later, researchers with the Brookings Institute have revisited the answers given by respondents and compared those numbers to how long those people actually did live—to see how well the people back then were able to guess how long they would live. As it turns out, most were wildly pessimistic. Explore further © 2014 Phys.org Credit: Peter Griffin/public domain Citation: Health and Retirement study indicates people wildly underestimate how long they will live (2014, November 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-health-people-wildly-underestimate.html More information: Better Financial Security in Retirement? Realizing the Promise of Longevity Annuities, www.brookings.edu/research/pap … ities-abraham-harrisAbstractThe shift in the U.S. retirement system away from company pensions and towards individual retirement accounts has placed greater responsibility on workers for ensuring the adequacy of their saving and managing those savings. Absent ready availability of or familiarity with suitable financial instruments, retirees increasingly are self-insuring against a variety of retirement risks, especially the risk of outliving their assets. One alternative to self-insuring against extended longevity is an insurance product known as a “longevity annuity.” The essence of a longevity annuity is a fixed stream of payments that begins with a substantial delay from the time the contract is purchased—a longevity annuity purchased at age 60 or 65, for example, might begin payments at age 75, 80 or 85. The current market for longevity annuities faces many barriers, ranging from consumer decision making that does not account adequately for longevity risk to the fiduciary concerns of employers to incomplete markets for the hedging of risk by insurance companies. In this paper, we highlight how recent trends have precipitated a need for products that offer protection against longevity risk, consider whether longevity annuities can improve retirement security, highlight barriers to more widespread take-up of longevity annuities, and offer a menu of potential reforms to bolster this fledgling market. Survey: Working longer—older Americans’ attitudes on work and retirement In looking at the data, the researchers found that the most pessimistic of them all, those who believed they had zero chance of living to 75, were wrong in almost half the cases. On the other end of the extreme, those who were absolutely certain they would live to 75, were good predictors, a little over 78 percent of them were right. The rest fell somewhere in-between.Such numbers are important because people are living longer and the population has shifted to the point where there is not enough young people paying into the social security pot to pay for all the retirees at the other end. Thus, people are having to save money on their own, and some, such as the folks at the Brookings Institute are afraid that if people are pessimistic about how long they’ll live, they won’t save enough should they outlive their expectations. But, they also offer a possible solution.Their idea is convince people to buy a longevity annuity—it’s a type of investment that pays a certain amount back over a certain number of years, which, as it turns out, is very similar to how social security works—only in this case, it’s all private and is based entirely on how much an investor puts in initially. They point out how quickly an investment can grow and how important it is that people take their retirement more seriously. Of course for that to happen, some means will have to be found for convincing people that their chances for living into their old age, is a lot higher than they think. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Naturally fluorescent amphibian found in Amazon basin

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img © 2017 Phys.org Explore further More information: Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs, PNAS, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1701053114AbstractFluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18−29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments. Fluorescence in the tree frog H. punctatus. Adult male under UV-blue light (400 nm; Upper) and white light (Lower). Credit: PNAS, doi/10.1073/pnas.1701053114 The cave squeaker returns: Rare frog seen after decades Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencescenter_img (Phys.org)—A team of Brazilian researchers has found a naturally fluorescent tree frog living in the Amazon basin and it represents the only known fluorescent amphibian. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their study of the frog, their surprise at finding it was fluorescent and their plans for further study to learn why it has such a remarkable feature. The most commonly known application of fluorescent material is the paint used on posters that glow brightly when exposed to a black light. In the natural world, fluorescence is observed in a variety of ocean creatures, including sharks, corals and sea turtles—and in a few land animals such as scorpions and parrots. Also, fluorescence is not the same as bioluminescence—fluorescent creatures do not generate the light via chemical reactions; instead, they have skin that is able to absorb short wavelength light and re-emit it as longer wavelength light.In studying the tiny frog (the South American polka dot tree frog— Hypsiboas punctatus), the researchers found a skin pigment they thought might result in fluorescence, so they pointed a black light at it and found the frog changed from a dull yellow color with red spots to a neon green frog with dark spots. Surprised by their finding, the researchers conducted a thorough investigation of the little amphibian’s skin. In so doing, they discovered three molecules, hyloin-L1, L2 and G1. Each has a ring and a hydrocarbon chain, which, the researchers note, is unlike known molecules that cause other creatures to be fluorescent. They also found that the molecules allowed for emitting a lot of light, approximately 18 percent as much as moonlight.The researchers do not know why the frogs are fluorescent, and they note the frogs have not been subjected to much prior study, which means there is a lot to learn. They plan to study photoreceptors in their eyes to find out if the frogs use their fluorescence to better see one another at night. They also plan to take a closer look at other tree frogs in the area to see if they, too, may have the same feature. Citation: Naturally fluorescent amphibian found in Amazon basin (2017, March 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-03-naturally-fluorescent-amphibian-amazon-basin.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Optically excited structural transition fastest electronic switch ever observed

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img Phase transition speed, as the researchers note, is typically constrained by the speed at which energy can enter a system. Ice turning to water, for example, is constrained by the speed at which heat can enter the ice. The process follows the rules of quantum mechanics, of course, though few theorists have believed it was possible for a transition to occur as fast as the rules allowed. In this new effort, the researchers have shown that such is the case by causing such a transition to occur.To test the limits of transition speed, the researchers cooled samples of indium on silicon to 30K and then measured the electron diffraction pattern of the surface and found it to be an insulator. They then fired a laser at the sample causing it to heat up very quickly—indium atoms assemble themselves automatically into three atom wide metallic wire when heated. Then they fired another laser pulse to measure how the diffraction pattern had changed. They repeated the process multiple times varying the time between laser firings to see how much time transpired before the insulator became a metal—as it turned out, for times longer than 350 fs. They also tried varying the amount of laser power and found that the more power they applied, the faster the transition—up to a point where it became a constant, which the team noted, was the quantum limit.Though describing the transition event as the fastest electronic switch ever observed, the team readily acknowledges that they are not suggesting that it could be used to somehow create optical switches for use in practical applications. Rather, they note, it was just some theorists doing some basic research. Citation: Optically excited structural transition fastest electronic switch ever observed (2017, March 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-03-optically-transition-fastest-electronic.html Explore further © 2017 Phys.org Electron diffraction patterns and surface structures. Credit: (c) Nature (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nature21432 More information: T. Frigge et al. Optically excited structural transition in atomic wires on surfaces at the quantum limit, Nature (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nature21432AbstractTransient control over the atomic potential-energy landscapes of solids could lead to new states of matter and to quantum control of nuclear motion on the timescale of lattice vibrations. Recently developed ultrafast time-resolved diffraction techniques1 combine ultrafast temporal manipulation with atomic-scale spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. These advances have enabled investigations of photo-induced structural changes in bulk solids that often occur on timescales as short as a few hundred femtoseconds. In contrast, experiments at surfaces and on single atomic layers such as graphene report timescales of structural changes that are orders of magnitude longer. This raises the question of whether the structural response of low-dimensional materials to femtosecond laser excitation is, in general, limited. Here we show that a photo-induced transition from the low- to high-symmetry state of a charge density wave in atomic indium (In) wires supported by a silicon (Si) surface takes place within 350 femtoseconds. The optical excitation breaks and creates In–In bonds, leading to the non-thermal excitation of soft phonon modes, and drives the structural transition in the limit of critically damped nuclear motion through coupling of these soft phonon modes to a manifold of surface and interface phonons that arise from the symmetry breaking at the silicon surface. This finding demonstrates that carefully tuned electronic excitations can create non-equilibrium potential energy surfaces that drive structural dynamics at interfaces in the quantum limit (that is, in a regime in which the nuclear motion is directed and deterministic)8. This technique could potentially be used to tune the dynamic response of a solid to optical excitation, and has widespread potential application, for example in ultrafast detectors.center_img Journal information: Nature Phase transition discovery opens the door to new electronics (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in Germany has used laser pulses to change an atomic wire from an insulator to a metal and back again in what the group describes as the fastest electronic switch ever observed. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their experiments testing the boundaries of phase transition speeds, which have proven that it can occur much faster under certain conditions than was thought possible. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


New quantum memory device small enough to fit on a chip

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img Scientists have been working steadily toward building quantum computers and networks, and have made strides in both areas in recent years. But one inhibiting factor is the construction of quantum memory devices. Such devices have been built, but until now, they have been too large to put on a chip, a requirement for practical applications. In this new effort, the researchers report developing a quantum memory device that is not only small enough to fit on a chip, but is also able to retrieve data on demand.The device is very small, approximately 10 by 0.7 micrometers and has an odd shape, like a Toblerone candy bar—long and thin with a notched triangular shape, with mirrors on either end. It is made of yttrium orthovanadate with small amounts of neodymium, which form a cavity. These cavities in turn hold a crystal cavity that traps single photons encoding data information (zero, one or both).To operate the device, the researchers fired laser pulses at it, causing photons to assemble in the comb, which forced them to be absorbed—the configuration also caused the photons to emerge from the comb after 75 nanoseconds. During the time period when the photons were absorbed, the researchers fired dual laser pulses at the comb to delay the reemergence of the photons for 10 nanoseconds, which allowed for on-demand retrieval of data. During the time period when the photons were held, they existed as dual pulses—early and late. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has built a quantum memory device that is approximately 1000 times smaller than similar devices—small enough to install on a chip. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes building the memory device and their plans for adding to its functionality. © 2017 Phys.org More information: Tian Zhong et al. Nanophotonic rare-earth quantum memory with optically controlled retrieval, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aan5959AbstractOptical quantum memories are essential elements in quantum networks for long distance distribution of quantum entanglement. Scalable development of quantum network nodes requires on-chip qubit storage functionality with control of its readout time. We demonstrate a high-fidelity nanophotonic quantum memory based on a mesoscopic neodymium ensemble coupled to a photonic crystal cavity. The nanocavity enables >95% spin polarization for efficient initialization of the atomic frequency comb memory, and time-bin-selective readout via enhanced optical Stark shift of the comb frequencies. Our solid-state memory is integrable with other chip-scale photon source and detector devices for multiplexed quantum and classical information processing at the network nodes.Press release Journal information: Science Play Video abstract where some of the authors describe the work. Credit: Dr. Tian Zhong, Dr. Andrei Faraon, Jonathan Kindem, Jake Rochman To show that the device was actually storing data information, the team compared the wavefunction of the photons both before and after storage and found them to be virtually unchanged, meaning they still held their zero, one or both state—it had not been destroyed, which meant the device was truly a quantum memory device. Explore furthercenter_img Citation: New quantum memory device small enough to fit on a chip (2017, September 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-quantum-memory-device-small-chip.html Physicists use quantum memory to demonstrate quantum secure direct communication PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Scanning electron microscope image showing the nano-scale optical quantum memory fabricated in yttrium orthovanadate (YVO). The schematic shows that this device is an optical cavity that contains Nd atoms. Credit: Dr. Tian Zhong This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Options galore in Belarus

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_imgBelarus might not have natural resources and might be marred by some crises in the past, but despite all that, the country has recorded substantial economic growth.The Belarusian government pursues the strategy of cautious reform with great concern for social welfare and stability, being a social-oriented market economy. The government helps in smooth transition from the command to market economy, providing social support to vulnerable population groups.  Since the late 1990s, Belarus has attained progress in economic reform and stabilisation. The country avoided the shutdown of its major industrial enterprises and retained one of the highest standards of living in former Soviet Union. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The industrial potential of Belarus includes 20 thermoelectric power stations, 17 metallurgical works, 70 petrochemical plants (the concern ‘Belneftekhim’), 29 machine-tool construction enterprises, 36 automakers, 37 tractor and agricultural engineering plants, 11 construction, road and municipal engineering plants, 20 food and light industry engineering enterprises, three research and-production associations of electronic industry, 41 enterprises of electrical industry, 36 instrument-makers, 70 research-and-production associations, plants and institutes of radio industry, 1,416 producers of light and textile industries. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe share of mechanical engineering and metalworking constitutes 25% of the country’s industrial output. According to recent researches, the number of small-scale enterprises exceeded 30 thousand. Six economic zones are established. 2,650 joint ventures and foreign enterprises with foreign investments are registered in Belarus. They are created with participation of 80 overseas countries.Among Belarus’ most powerful plants are Belarussian Autoworks BelAZ, Minsk Automobile Plant (MAZ), the Minsk Tractor Plant (MTZ), ‘Atlant’ (freezer and refrigerator plant), Belaruskaliy (the biggest producer of potassium fertilizers in the world) and oil refineries in Novopolotsk and Mozyr.last_img read more


Risqué romance and Austenprose

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_imgWe have come a long way since Jane Austen first published Pride and Prejudice in 1813 and the British literati heaved sighs soaked in 19th century restraint-laced romance. Long walks in the countryside, manners and mannerisms, old fashioned pleasantries interspersed with superheated battle of wits had to make up for the inability of the author, or the reader, to indulge in sexually explicit scenes. But wasn’t there an air of overcharged eroticism engulfing all of Austen’s, or even the Bronte sisters’ novels that still make them such breathless reads? Why do we keep revisiting their relatively ‘tame’ narratives, if there wasn’t the aura of something throbbing and lurking under the soft domestic strokes of their disciplined literary flourishes? Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The vintage British awkwardness, once a virtue, has now been supplanted by a risqué approach so brazen that publishing houses have come up with ‘sexed up’ versions of 19th century classics, particularly Pride and Prejudice, that has completed 200 years since its publication. All thanks to the phenomenon called Fifty Shades of Grey—a three-volume saga by the 50-year-old British author EL James (real name Erika Leonard) of a virginal Anastasia Steele who’s enlisted as a ‘sexual slave’ by the Seattle billionaire Christian Grey. Like a spruced up avatar of Charlotte Bronte’s Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixJane Eyre, Mr Grey, much like his literary predecessor Mr Rochester, has a room dedicated to his excesses of sexuality, in this case, of bondage and discipline, dominance and submission, sadism and masochism.Although separated by two centuries, Pride and Prejudice shares much with Fifty Shades, which include the classic female fiction tropes of fairy tale romances. The medieval stereotype – of the chaste and very young (but now willing, a merciful 20th century amendment) heroine, who is overpowered by an older man, impeccable in character, strength as well as social stature, but proud and condescending – remains intact. While Austen unravels her plot in the verdant fields and manor houses of Pemberley, James takes her narrative to fast-paced American cities such as Seattle and Washington. While Darcy is torn by his moral uprightness that clashes with his repressed sexuality, Grey is battered by his sexual overdrive and alterity, which are counterpoised to an inner kernel of societally approved definition of what is normal and what is right. In a way, Christian Grey is what Fitzwilliam Darcy has transformed into after 200 years of literary and cultural reimagination.Of course, literary prudes and cultural snobs can dismiss such an odious comparison as total hogwash, saying that the narrative merits of Austenprose outshine by a million times the hazy, neon-lit, pathetically consumerist sex scenes of James’ Fifty Shades. That the latter started off as a ‘fan fiction’ self-perpetuating on the sidelines of Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight saga is another interesting twist to the story. That one of the best-selling books of our times has had such an unoriginal origin is a development that sheds more light on how we read and stumble upon works of fiction these days, more than the literary merit of the particular book itself.Like Pride and Prejudice, Fifty Shades too has reached a cult status, although one cannot be sure if it will stand the test of time and lure readers 200 years into the future that Jane Austen’s novels are guaranteed to do. Another thread linking the two polar extremes is the genre of the chick-lit, the books on life, romance and the urban woman exemplified by the series Sex and the City. Yet, unlike Carrie Bradshaw and her friends, who are women of supreme independence, the typical chick-lit protagonists tend to fall back on the tried and tested tropes of marriage and fulfilment of love. That is where Fifty Shades of Grey meets Pride and Prejudice, in its continuation of the ‘manhunt’ by the willing women of our times.last_img read more


And the award goes to

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_imgThe award aspires to create a benchmark that custodians of Indian cultural forms will value, carrying forward global legacies.Lakhia is a distinguished disciple of renowned traditional Kathak gurus like Shambhu Maharaj, Birju Maharaj, Pandit Sunder Prasad, Radha Lal Mishra and Ashiq Hussain.She is credited for moving away from the solo form of Kathak starting in the 60s’, by turning it into a group spectacle and also innovations taking away traditional stories, adding contemporary story lines to the repertoire.Some of her most famous choreographies include Dhabkar (Pulse), Yugal (The Duet), and Atah-kim. She was also a choreographer in the Hindi film, Umrao Jaan (1981) with Gopi Krishna. She will be presented the award by Lalit Mansingh, vice president of ICCR.WHEN: 17 November, 6:30 pmWHERE: Kamani Auditoriumlast_img read more


Childs play

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_imgNational Museum  is celebrating the International Museum Day from Sunday with a five-week series of youth-centric summer workshops for developing their skills and talent in various fields of all-round personality.The various sessions will include painting workshops, story-telling sessions, clay-modelling and print-making. The children will also learn an ancient script and decorative arts form the core activities for boys and girls spanning from the age of seven to 17 years group in different categories in Playtime at National Museum sessions which will start from 18 May and continue till 25 June.  The stories and lecture sessions on 18 May Museum Day at the National Museum will be for the public at large, irrespective of age. It will start with a three-day Tanjore painting workshop for 30 students of the 13-17 age bracket. It features sessions of two hours each, starting from 11 am. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The Sunday proceedings will also see sessions open for people of all ages. In the forenoon is a Story in the Gallery on Hanuman (being delivered by Sanjib Kumar Singh, while afternoon sessions are two: How to Look at Miniatures led by Dr Kanaklata Singh and on Ancient Games led by Anamika Pathak and Zhahid Ali. The highlight of the day would be trail and activity, where children would be served with booklets at the National Museum reception. They can then trace the images shown in the book and return with stickers as proof to have found the objects at National Museum galleries. There will be touch-and-learn sessions on decorative art and a story session (on The Missing Necklace of the Harappan Girl) and Play with Clay in May. The June activities will cover print-making, script learning, story sessions and ‘know your museum’ besides touch-and-learn on arms and armour.last_img read more


A prismatic view of the night

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_imgLado Sarai Village, the art hub of the Capital brought to light the iconic concept of Art Night Out yesterday. A platform that brings together aspiring artists, art enthusiasts, curators and art writers to waltz from gallery to gallery, celebrating the true essence of art and culture. A kilometre-long stretch of the ancient village of Lado Sarai, amidst the historic Qutab Minar archeological complex, bursts into rainbow colours when the galleries open their new exhibitions together in the venture titled Lado Sarai Art Night. This joint effort by the art galleries of Lado Sarai helps them to boost their interest towards art over a joyous mood every year. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The participating galleries at this edition of Art Night Out were – Art District XIII, Latitude 28 and Studio Art. Art District XIII hosted  Ranjit Hoskotes (Curator) magnum opus Zameen, featuring  artists Atul Dodiya, Arun Kumar HG, Ashim Purkayastha, Baiju Parthan, Gigi Scaria,  Gargi Raina, Jagannath Panda,  Praneet Soi, Ranbir Kaleka, Ram Rahman, Ravi Agarwal,  Ryan Lobo, Veer Munshi, Vishwajyoti Gosh and Zarina Hashmi.‘Lado Sarai is fast becoming one of the Capital’s most fashionable art addresses with noted houses like us and others. This sort of collective initiative by all of us to draw viewers and buyers from the Capital ensuring decent boost to the art market of Delhi, by catering to the right set of audience,’ says curator, Hoskote. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixLatitude 28 brought Lahore-based artist Mohammad Ali Talpurs first solo art show in India, titled Alif which is on till 10 November.While speaking about the initiative, Bhavna Kakar (Founder and Director, Latitude 28) said, ‘We are happy to host this show for Talpur at  the gallery as a part of the Art Night in Lado Sarai. This is his first solo show in India, hence it holds a different significance for the artist, and us as well. We firmly believe that this joint effort by all the galleries will definitely add value to the identity of this historic urban village and its growing reputation as the Capital’s premier art hub. It should be the next art community hub on the street of Delhi. Studio Art hosted a group show by Japanese artists. It included works by Goroh Saitoh, Noriko Tamura, Minori Takahashi, Yoshifumi Nojima, Sayuri Azumi, Miwako Koyama, Shin Iguchi, Yuki Ideguchi and Tamako Kataoka.Ashna Singh, Director, Studio Art pointed out, ‘The concept of Art Night is a telling comment on the movement of the new art trends in the country. It’s becoming younger in years, more abstract and diverse in material, showing a marked shift in trends from the traditional approach of promoting art.last_img read more