Center creates programs for social research

Posted On Jan 26 2021 by

first_imgThe Center for Social Research (CSR) — located in Flanner Hall — is a new center that aims to help University faculty, students and staff of all disciplines conduct research on social questions.  “Our Center strives to improve the quality and efficiency of social research at Notre Dame,” CSR director Christian Smith said. “As a University-wide resource, the CSR supports all faculty, students and staff who conduct social research across the schools, colleges and academic disciplines.”According to Smith, a group of Notre Dame faculty and students saw many other top research universities already have social research programs in place. They created a proposal and brought it to the Strategic Academic Planning Committee. Seeing the value in providing this crucial research infrastructure, the Committee approved the proposal and the Center for Social Research began.“Faculty and students use a host of tools to gather and analyze the data on which they build their social research projects,” Smith said. “The Center for Social Research was founded with these scholars and their research needs in mind. Its expert staff can assist with the entire process, from research design to datasets acquisition and management, statistical problem solving, and grant budget administration.”The Center assists research projects throughout their life cycle — from the grant proposal to final publication. It offers four core services to faculty and students: statistical consulting, survey research, data management and grant administration.“We want to be a resource of first resort for all social researchers,” CSR associate director Kate Mueller said. “If your inquiry is something we can’t handle, we will do our best to refer you to other resources within or external to the University.”Smith spoke on his goals for the Center in its first year at the University, listing assisting researchers as his top goal.“My main goal for the year is for the CSR to increasingly partner with additional faculty, students and staff to support their research,” Smith said. “Sometimes, social researchers need help with research design, statistical analysis, survey implementation or other Research that require particular expertise or attention.”Michael Clark, the CSR Statistical Consultant, offered an “Introduction to R” course. Wednesday night. This is a short non-credit course designed to aid faculty and students in learning to use the various statistical computing programs that the Center offers. It will be held again April 15.In the future, the CSR plans to grow its resources for students.“Over time, we plan to expand the spectrum of non-credit short courses offered. We are also in the process of hiring even more staff with different sets of expertise, such as survey research design,” Smith said.last_img read more


Students petition against religious liberty lawsuit

Posted On Jan 26 2021 by

first_imgNotre Dame students are circulating a petition opposing the University’s decision to file a religious liberty lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a mandate issued by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The mandate, part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act passed in 2010, requires employers to provide contraceptive services in their minimum health insurance plans. The University filed its religious liberty lawsuit against the mandate in May. The suit states that the federal mandate is irreconcilable with the First Amendment, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and other laws protecting religious freedom. The petition, which includes signatures from approximately 140 students as of this week, faculty, staff and alumni, originated as a personal letter to University President Fr. John Jenkins from philosophy graduate student Kathryn Pogin. It argues for the University’s compliance with the mandate based on philosophical and legal principles. The petition organizers plan to submit the document to University administration at the end of the summer to allow students who return to campus to consider the petition’s ideas before it is submitted, Pogin said. The group did notify Jenkins of the petition’s circulation. “We want it to be a starting point for dialogue and discussion,” she said. “We didn’t want it to be antagonistic toward the administration or Fr. Jenkins.” Pogin said the petition focuses on three main issues arising from the University’s lawsuit, which states that the federal mandate is irreconcilable with the First Amendment, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and other laws protecting religious freedom. “First of all, it’s not clear to us that the University couldn’t comply with the mandate without remaining within Catholic practice,” she said. “In addition, even if there is a genuine conflict with freedom of religion, which we’re not convinced there is, at least with respect to contraceptives, we think the legal argument favors compliance with the mandate.” Another point of concern for signatories of the petition is the current level of campus services available to families, Pogin said. “Further, we believe Notre Dame would better serve its Catholic mission by focusing on improving campus services for families rather than embroiling itself in a legal challenge,” the petition states. The petition points out that “many, if not all, graduate students at Notre Dame who have children insure them through the state of Indiana because they cannot afford the university-provided healthcare,” which Pogin said is a serious issue that deserves greater attention from Notre Dame. “[The lack of affordable health coverage] is actually more of a problem than we outlined in the petition because state health programs are not available to international students, so some international students’ dependents go uninsured,” she said. “We think that’s a moral issue and an issue of Catholic identity.” Pogin said such issues of Catholic identity outside of the use of contraceptives have been inadequately addressed in the University’s lawsuit. “We think there are other issues of Catholic identity on campus that haven’t been addressed yet,” she said. “There’s nothing totally inconsistent about pursuing the suit and addressing the other things, but our point is that the University hasn’t addressed the other things in an adequate way yet and [Notre Dame] would better focus its energy on paying attention to those things.” University Spokesman Dennis Brown said the federal government is expected to respond to Notre Dame’s lawsuit next week. “The Department of Justice is expected to file a motion Aug. 6 to dismiss our lawsuit on the contention that the issue isn’t ‘ripe’ for adjudication until the regulations are finalized,” Brown said in an email. “Our response will be due 28 days later.” Brown also said Jenkins responded to a letter from students about the lawsuit with his own letter July 27. Managing Editor Megan Doyle contributed to this report.last_img read more


Professor analyzes translation on Rosetta Stone

Posted On Jan 26 2021 by

first_imgIn a lecture Friday titled “The Rosetta Stone and the Politics of Translation,” Ian Moyer, associate professor of history at the University of Michigan, said comparing the Greek and Egyptian text on the Rosetta Stone can illuminate the political situation of Ptolemaic Egypt in the Hellenistic Period. “[The Rosetta Stone] has to be one of the leading contenders for most famous, least read historical document,” Moyer said. “According to the British Museum stats, it’s the most visited object, and the British Museum is the second most visited art museum in the world.” The Rosetta Stone, which allowed scholars to decipher the Egyptian language, contains a decree honoring Egypt’s Hellenistic ruler Ptolemy V, and its text is written in hieroglyphics, demotic Egyptian and Greek, in that order, Moyer said. The Greek was most likely written first and then translated into these two variants of Egyptian, he said. “Several scholars have re-emphasized the Greek form of the decree … and its connections with other decrees that were used by many Greek city states to praise their benefactors, including Hellenistic kings in the wider Hellenistic world,” Moyer said. “Rather than representing an Egyptianization of the Ptolemaic state, the texts are rather seen as a sign that members of the Egyptian elite adopted the culture and political language of Hellenism and were integrated into the Ptolemaic state.” The Egyptian priests who translated these decrees into Greek had definitely adopted some of the habits of their Macedonian rulers, Moyer said. “Egyptian priests acted like a Greek polis or city-state to praise a Macedonian king as if he were an Egyptian pharaoh,” Moyer said. Moyer said these Egyptian priests were not completely Hellenized, and he thinks inconsistencies in the translations on the Rosetta Stone and similar decrees prove they retained some of their previous beliefs. For example, in the Canopus decree where new tribes were established in honor of Ptolemy III, the Greek word used to mean “tribe” describes a group of people in a civic context, while the corresponding Egyptian term describes a group of people in a religious context. “From the earliest period of Egyptian history, [‘tribes’] denoted groups of people who provided part time service to the temples, or in work crews or in mortuary cults, usually in some sort of rotation system,” Moyer said. “The difference between the two terms, Greek and Egyptian, was probably based on perceived structural and functional analogies. The Greek tribes … served among other purposes as constituent groups for the selection of magistrates and officials and also for a rotation of service in the prittanies, the rotating executive council of the city.” This difference in language proves the Egyptian priests still contextualized these Greek-style decrees in Egyptian terms, Moyer said. “The context of this translation … suggests that the Egyptian priests adopted it not just as a convenient approximation, but as a term whose political significance suited their purposes,” he said. Moyer said these discrepancies in translation reflect the competing cultural influences prevalent in Ptolemaic Egypt. “On the one hand, the priests who practiced this Hellenistic political discourse could well have become a community loyal to the Ptolemaic state,” he said. “On the other hand, a ramified response to the demands of this Hellenistic political discourse is not unlike … ‘sly civility,’ in as much as it was polite in its address but rather equivocal on accepting the terms of the actual discourse. “In the subtle politics of translation, the decrees offer insights into the ways the Egyptian priests were making sense of their world and their official communications.” Contact Tori Roeck at [email protected]last_img read more


Scholarship awarded to student, alumna duo

Posted On Jan 26 2021 by

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Gwen O’Brien In its 25th year, the Realizing the Dream Program awarded Saint Mary’s student, sophomore Maranda Pennington, with a $2,500 scholarships, funded by Lilly Endowment Inc.The Realizing the Dream Program seeks out first-generation college students enrolled in an institution of Independent Colleges of Indiana and acknowledges overall outstanding achievement in a student’s freshman year. Pennington was nominated by Saint Mary’s and received the award November 1st at the Realizing the Dream banquet in Indianapolis, Ind.Pennington’s scholarship will go towards her tuition as she pursues a degree in nursing.“Having my hard work recognized through this award means so much to me,” Pennington said. “It makes all the time I’m putting in to reach my goals worthwhile.”Along with receiving her scholarship, Pennington was asked to nominate a secondary teacher who influenced her decision to attend college, she said. For Pennington, this teacher was Saint Mary’s alumna, Jennifer Hardebeck Luce, class of ’96. Luce was presented with a Professional Development Grant of $1,000 as her award for nomination.Pennington said Luce became her greatest mentor after she had Luce as her Spanish teacher in middle school.“Her support and guidance ever since [middle school] has helped transform me into the person I am today,” Pennington said. “I now consider her a part of my family and I know that she will continue to be there for me in the years to come.”Pennington said Luce’s experience at Saint Mary’s influenced her decision to attend the College.“After seeing the impact that her Saint Mary’s College education had on her character as well as her competence as an educator, I knew that it was in my best interest to learn more about Saint Mary’s,” Pennington said.Luce accompanied Pennington on her first visit to Saint Mary’s during her junior year of high school, she said.“I fell in love with Saint Mary’s immediately and I knew that it was where I wanted to further my education,” Pennington said.Pennington said Luce always told her that Saint Mary’s would be a perfect fit.“I am glad I am at an institution that fosters the development of my character as well as prepares me for my nursing career,” Pennington said. “[Luce] was right from the very beginning because I can’t see myself anywhere else but at Saint Mary’s College.”Tags: independent colleges of indiana, jennifer hardebeck luce, lilly endowment, maranda pennington, mentorship program, realizing the dream, realizing the dream program, the dreamlast_img read more


Mendoza drops to No. 2 in rankings

Posted On Jan 26 2021 by

first_imgTags: business, mendoza college of business, rankings Bloomberg Businessweek ranked the University’s Mendoza College of Business No. 2 out of 114 schools nationwide in their annual ranking of undergraduate business programs in a report released Monday. “A tradition of excellence and a commitment to ethical business is the deepest part of our identity. We continually look for ways to advance our curriculum to stay current with developing trends so that our students leave here prepared to meet the challenges of the global economy,” Roger Huang, the Martin J. Gillen Dean of the Mendoza College of Business said in an email. “All this we do irrespective of the rankings and therefore fact that the ranking is discontinued will not divert us from that course.”Mendoza held the No. 1 spot for five consecutive years starting in 2010 and lasting until 2014. “The ranking is based on four components — recruiter feedback, student surveys, starting salary data and internships. So first and foremost, Mendoza was ranked No. 1 by the students, which is very meaningful to me. Again, I think their response signals how much they value what we do here at Mendoza,” Huang said.Huang said he was pleased with the No. 2 ranking overall. “Since this is the last year that Bloomberg is ranking undergraduate programs, it would have been nice to continue our five-year streak of being No. 1. But I certainly am pleased with being ranked No. 2, especially since I realize all the hard work and dedication from students, faculty, staff and alumni that goes into making our program as excellent as it is,” Huang said. Mendoza will continue its tradition of excellence in the coming years, Huang said.  “I also want to emphasize that regardless of any ranking, we remain faithful to our mission of service and vision that business is a force for good in society,” Huang said. “That never changes for us, and our students reflect its importance in all of the amazing things they do.”Huang said he also appreciates the hard work of the career center at the University. “Recruiters also ranked us highly, which definitely helped our overall score. This, too, is meaningful to me, because it reflects the hard work of the Notre Dame Career Center to place our students,” Huang said.According to a University press release, Bloomberg updated their ranking methodology this year. “Bloomberg updated the rankings to put a heavy emphasis on career paths. It no longer includes any academic quality metrics, such as intellectual capital or faculty research, which previously accounted for 30 percent of the ranking. While I agree that careers are important, I don’t agree with eliminating academic quality altogether,” Huang said. Additionally, Huang said they eliminated the alumni feedback component. “Bloomberg also excluded alumni ratings of their own alma maters in a portion of the recruiter feedback. To us, the Notre Dame network is an amazing resource for our students. We value their help and wisdom,” Huang said. last_img read more


Expert discusses strategy for countering Islamist radicalism

Posted On Jan 26 2021 by

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, president of American Forum for Democracy, speaks at a lecture Monday. Jasser spoke about countering radicalization in the Muslim world, focusing on the role of the ‘Islamist Establishment’“If we simply treat the symptom of terrorism, we’re not going to get anywhere,” Jasser said. “We’ll continue this sort of ‘whack-a-mole’ program that does not deal with the central problem.”Jasser said the Islamist establishment is the root cause of the issues Muslims and Islam face. “There are always two parties — the party of the past and the party of the future; the establishment and the movement,” Jasser said, evoking a quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson.The Islamic Establishment is mostly outside of the United States, and unlike Christianity throughout Europe in the 17th century, there has been no revolution within Islam, Jasser said. As a result, Jasser said, there is often a disconnect between the lay Muslim community in America and the Muslim leadership who are often Islamist in ideology.“What radicalizes the militants [is the establishment] telling them that they would die for the Islamic state,” Jasser said. “What inoculated [Jasser] against radicalization, was the belief that the only thing [Jasser] ever want[s] to die for is the United States, a country built on a constitution that separated mosque, or church and state.”Jasser noted that Iran has the largest rate of people converting to atheism due to the fact that the people do not want to be governed by a theocracy. Thus, he suggests that in order to combat radicalization, there is a need to separate mosque and state in Islamic nations, and the only way to do this is through a period of revolution. In 2011, many Arab nations experienced revolution, in what has become known as the Arab Spring, and Jasser believes these movements have changed the entire narrative. “What changed with the revolutions is that, for so long in the 20th century we thought that the Middle East and Muslim consciousness was inextricably wedded to being either theocracts or being under military dictatorship,” Jasser said. ”Ultimately the revolutions began a process of modernization.” Though revolution may be difficult and painful, it is an important ingredient for a nation’s evolution, Jasser said, as for over 30 years in the 17th century, western European nations were involved in wars against theocracies. Today, Jasser suggests, Islam is going through a similar transformation.But, the war against radicalization cannot be won through military action. Instead, Jasser suggested the United States and other Western nations must begin the campaign by countering the ideology.“The main laboratory where we can do reform and renewal is in the West,” he said. “It is time for us to take the offense against these guys ideologically. We’re not going to win this war militarily.”Tags: College Republicans, Islamism, Notre Dame Young Americans for Freedom, Radicalism Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, president of American Forum for Democracy, addressed the question of Islamism and combating the Islamist establishment in a Monday lecture hosted by the Young Americans for Freedom and Notre Dame College Republicans.Islam is often viewed through the lens of terrorism, but, for Jasser, this explanation is insufficient because it fogs the narrative of what is happening within the Muslim community, Jasser said.  last_img read more


Fed Official: NY Law Limiting DMV Data Access Goes Too Far

Posted On Jan 18 2021 by

first_imgImage by New York State DMV.ALBANY — The nation’s top immigration enforcement official say that New York’s new law allowing people who are in the U.S. illegally to get driver’s licenses goes far beyond other states’ measures in restricting his agency’s access to motor vehicle records.In response to that law, the Department of Homeland Security blocked New York state residents from enrolling or re-enrolling in Global Entry and other “trusted traveler” programs that allow people to avoid long security lines at borders and airports.New York then sued the department, and the Democratic governor called called the move to keep state residents from the program “political jihad” on Thursday.But Acting Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director Matthew Albence defended the move to bar New Yorkers from the programs, telling reporters Thursday that the new law’s restrictions could hinder his officers from assisting in ongoing criminal investigations involving stolen or wanted vehicles. Albence appeared at the Rensselaer County Sheriff’s Office alongside several state law enforcement officials critical of New York’s law. A spokesman for Attorney General Letitia James, a Democrat, said New York’s law still ensures law enforcement has access to the information it needs to do its job.In its lawsuit, New York alleges that the move by the Trump administration was intended to punish the state for its law.“They will hold one thing hostage to get what they want,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo told reporters, later adding: “And understand what they want: They want access to a database that has undocumented people who have done nothing wrong. If a person committed a crime, they have access to that database because the FBI gets it.”Cuomo met with Trump last week to propose giving federal officials access to the state driving records of applicants to traveler programs who undergo a sit-down interview with federal officials and supply documents such as a passport.The governor has said he’s awaiting word from Trump on next steps, but has said such a compromise would need legislative approval.New York is among more than a dozen states that have passed laws allowing people who are not legal U.S. residents to get driver’s licenses.But each state differs when it comes to whether and how federal immigration officials can access state motor vehicle records. Some states, like Nevada and New Jersey, have outlined restrictions for the release of driver’s license information to federal officials.“It is really unclear and in most cases, state agencies don’t even know what kind of data is being shared,” said policy analyst Jamie Vimo of the National Immigration Law Center, which supported New York’s law.New York’s law allows for the release of state motor vehicle records to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency and other agencies “primarily enforcing immigration law” under a judicial warrant or court order.The state can also disclose limited records to an immigration enforcement agency working with city, state and federal agencies on non-immigration enforcement matters. Motor vehicle records can’t be used for “civil immigration purposes.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),No surprise.,Impeach Cuomolast_img read more


Mr. Chickee’s Funny Money to Have New York Premiere Off-Broadway

Posted On Jan 18 2021 by

first_imgMr. Chickee’s Funny Money, a new R&B musical based on the best-selling book by Christopher Paul Curtis, featuring music and lyrics by Lamont Dozier, with additional lyrics by Paris Dozier and a book by David Ingber, is set to have its New York premiere. Directed by Jade King Carroll, the show will play a limited engagement off-Broadway April 12 through May 4 at Atlantic Theater Company’s Linda Gross Theater. Dozier’s multiple hits include “Stop in the Name of Love,” “Sugar Pie Honey Bun” and “How Sweet it Is.” Ingber’s credits include Major League Baseball Fan Cave. The story follows 10-year-old Steven, a self-proclaimed spy and president of the “Flint Future Detectives Club.” At the heart of this whimsical journey is an intelligent, entrepreneurial boy who is asked to unlock the secret behind a mysterious bill. With his pals (and their giant flying dog, Zoopy) Steven discovers that family, friends, imagination and determination are the true keys to success; and sharing the spotlight with others can make one even richer. Mr. Chickee’s Funny Money will feature musical supervision by Brian Usifer, musical direction by Geraldine Boyer-Cussac and choreography by MK Lawson. Casting will be announced shortly. View Commentslast_img read more


Odds & Ends: Hilty’s Cravings & Spacey’s Final Bow

Posted On Jan 18 2021 by

first_img Cory Michael Smith Tapped for Batman Prequel Broadway alum Cory Michael Smith has boarded the pilot of the hotly anticipated Batman prequel series. According to EW, the Breakfast at Tiffany’s star will play the future Riddler, Edward Nygma. Star Files Megan Hilty View Comments Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Kevin Spacey to do One More Show at the Old Vic Kevin Spacey, who is due to step down as the Artistic Director of the Old Vic next year, is likely to do one more play for the London theater after the upcoming production of Clarence Darrow. He joked to The Hollywood Reporter about his ten-year stint at the venue “I’ve learned how to get people at (fundraising) auctions very drunk.” He also confessed that he is such a big fan of Wimbledon champion Andy Murray he has traveled the world to watch the Scottish tennis star play. Megan Hilty’s Craving Champagne Pregnant Broadway bombshell Megan Hilty has admitted that she’s craving “everything that I can’t have!” The Smash star told E! Online, “I want sushi, I want champagne…!” She and her hubby Brian Gallagher also revealed they “want to know” the baby’s sex and have been busy picking out names. If it’s a girl, maybe Marilyn works?!last_img read more


Ronan Keating Will Star in London’s Once

Posted On Jan 18 2021 by

first_img The current West End cast stars David Hunter and Jill Winternitz who are joined by Fiona Bruce, Jamie Cameron, Mark Carlisle, Matthew Ganley, Mathew Hamper, Daniel Healy, Loren O’Dair, Miria Parvin, Tim Prottey-Jones, Jez Unwin, Juliana Cotton, Demi Lee, Gemma Loader and Ruby Payne. Irish pop superstar Ronan Keating will join the West End cast of the Olivier award-winning musical Once to play the leading role of Guy on November 17. Directed by John Tiffany, the London production opened in April 2013. Keating began his career as a member of Boyzone in 1993, selling over 25 million records worldwide. As a solo artist he went on to sell 20 million records around the world. Before joining the cast of Once, Keating will return to Australia for a fourth year as a judge on The X-Factor. View Comments Based on the 2006 film, Once features a score by the movie’s stars and Academy Award-winning composers for “Falling Slowly,” Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova. The show premiered at New York Theatre Workshop before opening at Broadway’s Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre on March 18, 2012. Once won eight Tony Awards, including honors for Tiffany, as well as Enda Walsh for his book for the romantic musical.last_img read more